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Minnesota Secretary of State shares initial thoughts on outcome of Nov. 3

Troy Krause
More than 78 percent of the eligible voters in Minnesota showed up to vote during the Nov. 3 general election.

According to Steve Simon, Minnesota Secretary of State, as of Nov. 4, a total of 3,216,814 had voted.

That, Simon added, means 78.1 percent of eligible voters in the state cast their ballot.

Simon spoke with the media during an online conference with the media at noon Nov. 4, and he indicated that he was happy with the outcome at that point – calling it a “textbook election.” 

Simon said, as of Wednesday, he had not heard of any polling place issues in Minnesota. He expressed his appreciation to the 30,000 election judges in the state who made the extra efforts to help make the election successful.

There are a “lot of moving parts” to a successful election, Simon added, and with the high voter turnout traffic management was done well.

According to Simon, his office does not touch a single ballot as they are counted, calling the election administrators “rock stars” for their efforts despite last minute changes and all of the stress that comes with running a successful election.

“There is a reason our elections are the envy of the nation,” Simon said.

With a strong historic voting record, Simon said Minnesota is poised to be number one in the nation as it relates to voter turnout, and with more than 78 percent of eligible voters turning out the state “pulled off something extraordinary.”

The public is reminded that there are some areas that have ordinances regarding the removal of campaign signs.

By in large, explained Simon, Minnesota is a purple state, as was evident in the outcome of state and federal elections across Minnesota.

Not all of the results have been officially announced, and Simon said the process is slow by design to ensure that every eligible vote is counted.

He added there is also the potential of recounts in the state, should those elections meet the threshold – a difference of one quarter of one percent for state races and one half of one percent for federal seats.

Of course, he added, recounts are not automatic, as they need to be requested.

Simon said there is still plenty of work to do before the 2020 general election will be considered officially complete.

Keep up with current information at www.sos.state.mn.us/.