One of the saddest trends I have found while knocking doors is to find people who are at home giving care to their spouse with dementia. Yesterday, I sat in the living room of one such man for a long time as he told his tale. I won't relate details here, but he's trying to figure out what to do. Is she bad enough to be placed in a unit? He still values her companionship, but the work is overwhelming him. 


The Alzheimer's Association has excellent help for people in such situations and just as I was about to suggest he call them, he handed me the card with their number. "I am thinking of calling here," he said. He held the card as if it were the number of a treatment center and he was contemplating turning himself in. He had great resistance to getting help.  


"There are no support groups," he said, sadly. There could be, I know, because I know others in the same town in the same situation. If there is anything that can help care givers for dementia patients, to say nothing of the patients themselves, it is meeting with others in the same situation. 


Here are problems with solutions that don't necessarily require government intervention or money. 


I decided to knock doors the past two days, drizzle and gray non-withstanding. It isn't quite as fun when it is bleary, and the people are a little groggy. Fewer come to the door, I believe!


Another week gone by. They slip by fast. 


One of the saddest trends I have found while knocking doors is to find people who are at home giving care to their spouse with dementia. Yesterday, I sat in the living room of one such man for a long time as he told his tale. I won't relate details here, but he's trying to figure out what to do. Is she bad enough to be placed in a unit? He still values her companionship, but the work is overwhelming him. 

The Alzheimer's Association has excellent help for people in such situations and just as I was about to suggest he call them, he handed me the card with their number. "I am thinking of calling here," he said. He held the card as if it were the number of a treatment center and he was contemplating turning himself in. He had great resistance to getting help.  

"There are no support groups," he said, sadly. There could be, I know, because I know others in the same town in the same situation. If there is anything that can help care givers for dementia patients, to say nothing of the patients themselves, it is meeting with others in the same situation. 

Here are problems with solutions that don't necessarily require government intervention or money. 

I decided to knock doors the past two days, drizzle and gray non-withstanding. It isn't quite as fun when it is bleary, and the people are a little groggy. Fewer come to the door, I believe!

Another week gone by. They slip by fast.