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Redwood Falls Gazette
This blog relates to life observations before and after age 50. Basically how change is inevitable and affects the way we see things
When I Remember to Forget
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About this blog
By Lori Broschat
I am a Devils Lake native, a recipient of three college degrees including a Master of Divinity from Asbury Theological Seminary. I have been a pastor in the United Methodist Church since 1997 and I was appointed to my home church in Devils Lake in ...
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This Side of 50
I am a Devils Lake native, a recipient of three college degrees including a Master of Divinity from Asbury Theological Seminary. I have been a pastor in the United Methodist Church since 1997 and I was appointed to my home church in Devils Lake in July 2014. I love to write and have some published works. Blogging is a hobby of mine and this will be my third blog. I have a grown daughter named Ashley who is a student and sometime resident of Devils Lake. I am a movie buff, an Anglophile, and I possess more books than I have time to read!
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I have the type of skin that scars easily and bruises easily.† Someone once told me that I would bruise if a mosquito landed on me.† As I grow older my skin is just naturally acquiring some dark spots and looking older.† I recently realized my hands and forearms look like my mother's arms, and she was in her late 80s when she passed.



Our skin is certainly prone to carrying many marks along the journey of our lives, but thankfully it is there to protect us from further harm.† Some people we consider thin-skinned, meaning they are especially sensitive to being hurt or insulted. Somehow, having a thick skin is prized, but surely that's a way of saying someone is a little insensitive and cold.



When it comes to scars, I have several of those as well.† Scars serve almost as a visible marker, a reminder of some wound, whether accidental or surgical.† Some scars are not visible, and those are the ones on the inside.† We all remember the little rhyme, "sticks and stones may break my†bones, but words will never hurt me." Whoever wrote that was lying to themselves, because some of the greatest pain I have ever endured came from the use of words.



How do we remember to forget such hurts when what we really want is revenge or to give someone a taste of their own medicine?† For some this might require some counseling and a great deal of time.† For others, it might be easier to forgive and forget, although there is some debate as to whether we are actually able to forget even when we've forgiven.



I am currently working on a new book inspired by the reality of our scars, whether inside or outside.†† I will be taking a look at some incidences in Scripture of hurtful or harmful behavior and its result on the individuals involved.† I will also be sharing some of my experiences and those of others and relate them to the types of experiences in Scripture.† There are those things that hurt us in which we are completely innocent, and those things we do that hurt ourselves.



There are also ways to overcome these hurts before they become permanent scars on our psyche.† Through prayer, reading the promises of Scripture, and the use of counseling we can help to heal ourselves.† If we need to seek to be forgiven, we should not hesitate to take that first step.† If we need to forgive we should also make that move, but where reconciliation is not possible, we may have to settle for forgiveness in our hearts.



Living with scars is probably inevitable because of the way our skin adapts to injury, but emotional scars do not have to be our way of living.† Christians believe that forgiveness is mandatory if we are to receive God's forgiveness.† Other religions practice different means of forgiveness, but regardless of your faith or lack of it, your own emotional health depends on your ability to remember to forget.

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