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Redwood Falls Gazette - Redwood Falls - MN
From the Will Rogers quote, \x34All politics is applesauce.\x34
Does the Tea Party movement really exist as a formal political organization?
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Pat Cunningham offers an unabashedly liberal perspective on national politics. A note of caution: The language gets a little salty on some of the sites to which this blog links. So, don't say you weren't warned. By the way, this blog's name is ...
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Liberal Views
Pat Cunningham offers an unabashedly liberal perspective on national politics. A note of caution: The language gets a little salty on some of the sites to which this blog links. So, don't say you weren't warned. By the way, this blog's name is inspired by the Will Rogers quote, \x34All politics is applesauce.\x34 In 41 years as a print and broadcast journalist, most of those years with the Rockford (Ill.) Register Star, Pat has covered national politics under eight American presidents. He's attended 10 national political conventions, Republican and Democratic alike, and has interviewed countless prominent political players, including Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, Gerald Ford and George H.W. Bush.
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tea_party

The answer to the question in the headline above would seem to be no.

The Tea Party has become — or perhaps always was — a more amorphous political entity than either the Republican or Democratic parties.

The political philosophies most frequently associated with the Tea Party movement existed before the Tea Party entered the public consciousness five years ago and probably will exist after the Tea Party label fades away. And the chance that it will, in fact, fade way seems ever more likely.

A recent poll shows that public support for the Tea Party is steadily declining and now stands at only 15 percent.

Nate Silver argues HERE that the term “Tea Party” has outlived its usefulness:

What is the tea party, exactly? That’s not so clear. There are a constellation of groups, like Tea Party Patriots, FreedomWorks and Americans for Prosperity, who sometimes associate themselves with the movement or are associated with it. But their agendas can range from libertarian to populist and do not always align. As in Missouri, they often do not endorse the same candidate. Nor do they always endorse the candidate who self-identifies as member of the tea party.

Is the tea party opposed to the Republican establishment or has it been co-opted by it? That’s also hard to say. The Tea Party Caucus no longer exists in a substantive way in the House. A group that called itself the Senate Tea Party Caucus did hold a meeting at some point last summer. The attendees included [Mitch] McConnell and [John] McCain  — those establishment stalwarts…

Perhaps it’s time to discourage the use of “tea party.” Or, at the very least, not to capitalize it…

 

 

 

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