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Redwood Falls Gazette - Redwood Falls - MN
  • Ed Hart’s food for the soul

  • Every morning Ed Hart goes to the vegetable garden beside his E. 5th St. house for a handful of fresh kale and chard; back in the kitchen, he puts the leaves in a very expensive blender, mixes it with water, banana, and grapes, and gets his all-natural energy boost for the day — Hart said last week, “You take one drink, and your cells start singing hallelujah.”
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  • Every morning Ed Hart goes to the vegetable garden beside his E. 5th St. house for a handful of fresh kale and chard.
    Back in the kitchen, he puts the leaves in a very expensive blender, mixes it with water, banana, and grapes, and gets his all-natural energy boost for the day.
    Hart said last week, “You take one drink, and your cells start singing hallelujah.”
    Ed, who turns 75 in a few months, says, “I was sure I wasn’t going to get to 75. I was kind of a juvenile delinquent. I’ve been hard on my body, and I’m all patched together now.
    “When I was young, I ate whatever I wanted. Now I’m in touch with my body, and since I’ve tried my ‘green drink’, it’s like turning a light on.”
    Hart, a native of Las Angeles, California, has moved around a lot over the years.
    Before he and his wife Pat moved to Redwood Falls six years ago to be closer to relatives, Hart worked as — among other things — an auto parts salesman in Louisiana, a frame shop and art gallery owner in Washington, and a semi-pro poker player all over.
    “I took up gardening when I lived in Louisiana. I sort of followed my wife, Pat, into health,” he said. “She started growing wheat grass, which is horrible stuff, but is good for you.”
    Since inventing his “green drink”, Hart has created an indoor garden downstairs in his mancave for getting fresh kale and chard during the Minnesota winters.
    “If you think about it, we’re creatures who started out as foragers,” he said. “When our ancestors would find (an edible plant), they’d eat it down to the nub. Now this is real food.”
    Hart explained that using a blender has its advantages, though.
    “We probably get more nutrients out of the plants that a creature eating them in the wild. They have to work harder to break down that cellulose.”
    Retired, Hart spends much of his time today being the grandpa-taxi for his grandkids.
    “I love it,” he said. “It’s as good for me as my green drink!”
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